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Microsoft

E-Learning Objekt zu Power Point

Flussdiagramme dienen zur Darstellung von Prozessen, und ihre Stärke liegt darin, dass sie Prozesse sichtbar machen. Zusammengesetzt aus Formen, Text und Pfeilen kann ein Flussdiagramm alles von einer schrittweisen Anweisung bis hin zur Entwicklung einer Idee enthalten. Wenn der darzustellende Prozess relativ kurz und einfach ist oder logisch aufgeteilt werden kann, ist PowerPoint bestens zum Erstellen eines Flussdiagramms geeignet. Alle allgemein üblichen Formen und Pfeile für Flussdiagramme stehen zur Verfügung, und ein großer Vorteil ist, dass das Farbschema der Folie auf das Diagramm übertragen wird.

Video

Siemens Stiftung

Verification of amino acids and proteins in the human body (with subtitles)

Video (01:33 minutes, without sound):
The experiment shows how ninhydrin solution can be used to verify the presence of amino acids in human sweat.

A student makes a handprint on a piece of filter paper. The teacher then sprays the paper with ninhydrin solution. After a certain time and with the addition of heat, the handprint appears with a bluish-purple coloring. The heat is added to accelerate the development process. (However, the experiment works only with a very sweaty hand.)

For some scenes, explanations are displayed as subtitles. However, the film is also available without subtitles on the media portal: "Verification of amino acids and proteins in the human body (without subtitles)."

Information and ideas:
The experiment "Verification of amino acids and proteins in the human body" involves ninhydrin solution. For safety reasons, however, some teachers may not want to allow any experiments involving ninhydrin solution in their classrooms. In this case, the teachers can show the video as an alternative.
Detailed experimentation instructions are found in the medium "Verification of amino acids and proteins in the human body (student instructions)," which is available on the media portal.

Medientypen

Video

Lernalter

11-18

Schlüsselwörter

Amino acids Metabolism

Sprachen

Englisch

Video

Siemens Stiftung

Boosting battery performance (without subtitles)

Video (04:33 minutes, without sound):
The experiment with the Cu/Zn element shows that a battery reaches its full capacity only when Cu2+ ions are present.


The combination of two metals is often misconstrued as an essential feature of electrochemical elements (batteries, accumulators). In reality, however, an element consists of the combination of two metal redox pairs. The zinc/copper battery often used in the classroom - made with fruit, vegetables, or even with acid or saltwater - is in reality a zinc/hydrogen element (Zn/Zn2+ and H/H+). The voltage and power are therefore less than the values for Zn/Cu. The battery does not become a Zn/Cu element (Zn/Zn2+ and Cu/Cu2+) until the copper half-cell also contains copper ions from the dissolved copper sulfate. Then the element reaches full voltage and power.

The film is also available on the media portal as a version in which explanations are displayed as subtitles for some scenes: "Boosting battery performance (with subtitles)."

Information and ideas:
The experimentation instructions for "A3 Lemon batteries and other batteries" contain two subexperiments (4 and 5) that involve copper sulfate. For safety reasons, however, some teachers may not want to allow any experiments involving copper sulfate in their classrooms. In this case, the teachers can show this video with subexperiment 4 as an alternative. This allows the overall experiment consisting of subexperiments set up as many didactic steps to be completed systematically anyway.
The teacher should point out to the students that the simplified experiment shown in the film works without a separator. Detailed experimentation instructions are found in the medium "A3 Lemon batteries and other batteries (student instructions)" for subexperiment 4, which is available on the media portal. The technical explanation is found in the medium "A3 Lemon batteries and other batteries (teacher instructions)."

Video

Siemens Stiftung

Solar cell

Video (00:30 minutes): Shows how a solar cell works based on a simple experiment and explains the theory. The video presents the solar cell as a supplier of power. When illuminated by a lamp, a wind turbine begins to turn. With the aid of a graphic, the flow of current is explained on the basis of the band model of solids and the quantum nature of light. This video is an excerpt from the teaching DVD, "Optik - Eigenschaften des Lichts".

Video

Siemens Stiftung

Water as wave model

Video (00:07 minutes, without sound):
A stone is thrown into calm water, ripples are formed.

The vibrations emitted by a source of sound can be compared with the ripples or waves created when a stone is thrown into calm water.
It is, however, directly comparable only as far as the concentric shape of propagation is concerned. Looked at in detail, the vibrations are in fact very different.

Information and ideas:
Students can do the experiment themselves on an excursion out of school.

Relevant for teaching:
Acoustic phenomena
Sound/acoustics: parameters
Communication and understanding
Vibrations and waves


Dieses Material ist Teil einer Sammlung

Video

Siemens Stiftung

Meat and Sustainability

Video:
Animated film that clearly shows the impact of high meat consumption in Germany

On average, each German eats nearly 90 kilograms of meat per year. That is excessive and problematic in many ways. Industrial production of meat is unsustainable in many aspects - area of land use, global food supply, climate change, animal rights, pollution, and health.

What problems are specifically caused by industrial meat production? What are the global consequences? What can be done about it?


Dieses Material ist Teil einer Sammlung

Video

Siemens Stiftung

Stomata, hair cells and xylem

Video (00:42 minutes):
The cells on the underside of a leaf are observed under a microscope.

The camera pans from a shot of a leaf to the microscope image of the leaf. You can see the stomata, cells with small openings. In addition, the video shows a microscope image of a hair cell, which is then magnified again to visualize it better.

The video is an excerpt from the teaching DVD "Basiswissen BIO I - Pflanzenzellen, Fotosynthese, Atmung" (English audio channel available).

Video

Siemens Stiftung

Properties of a concave reflector

Video (00:22 minutes):
Light strikes a concave reflector and ignites a sparkler in the process.


The video shows a light source directed at a concave reflector. The reflected light is concentrated into a focal point. The high temperature of the focal point ignites a sparkler.
The video ends with a concrete application of this physical principle - the solar stove.

This video is an excerpt from the teaching DVD,
"Optik - Eigenschaften des Lichts".

Medientypen

Video

Lernalter

13-18

Schlüsselwörter

Optics Power generation Solar energy

Sprachen

Englisch

Video

Siemens Stiftung

Cells of a leaf

Video (02:00 minutes):
Different plant cells are observed under an electron microscope.

The introduction to the video briefly shows different plants, and then different plant cells under an electron microscope. In the main video, the inside of a leaf is examined under an electron microscope. The individual cell layers and cells are explained, including the epidermis cells in the epidermis, the palisade cells, and the spongy tissue, which together form the mesenchyme.

The video is an excerpt from the teaching DVD "Basiswissen BIO I - Pflanzenzellen, Fotosynthese, Atmung" (English audio channel available).

Video

Siemens Stiftung

Spontaneous copper plating? (with subtitles)

Video (02:23 minutes, without sound):
The experiment shows how the surface of a 1-euro coin that is placed on aluminum foil in a copper sulfate solution becomes coated with the copper deposited from the solution.

All less noble metals that are immersed in the salt solution of a more noble metal dissolve and cause the deposition of the more noble metal. If you place a coin made from relatively noble alloys (brass, nickel) on very base aluminum foil, the coin's surface will become coated with copper (Cu). The object to be coated can consist of any chemically inert, conductive material or, for example, of graphite. The electrons required for the copper to deposit come from the dissolved aluminum (Al). The process is, so to speak, an internal short circuit of a Cu/Al element. The deposited copper is initially reddish and then partly oxidizes to dark copper oxides when it comes into contact with oxygen in the air.

For some scenes, explanations are displayed as subtitles. However, the film is also available without subtitles on the media portal: "Spontaneous copper plating? (without subtitles)."

Information and ideas:
The experimentation instructions for "A3 Lemon batteries and other batteries" contain two subexperiments (4 and 5) that involve copper sulfate. For safety reasons, however, some teachers may not want to allow any experiments involving copper sulfate in their classrooms. In this case, the teachers can show this video with subexperiment 5 as an alternative. This allows the overall experiment consisting of subexperiments set up as many didactic steps to be completed systematically anyway.
Detailed experimentation instructions are found in the medium "A3 Lemon batteries and other batteries (student instructions)" for subexperiment 5, which is available on the media portal.