Bild

Siemens Stiftung

Phase diagram of water

Diagram:
A P-T diagram for pure water. The lines indicate the temperature and the pressure at which the solid, liquid, and vapor phases exist in equilibrium. All three phases exist in equilibrium only at the triple point; otherwise, there are a maximum of two phases.

In addition to the equilibrium curves (melting pressure curve, sublimation curve, vapor pressure curve), the diagram also includes the pressure and temperature data for the melting, boiling, triple, and critical points.
Attention: The axes of the diagram are not shown true to scale.

Information and ideas:
This diagram also reflects the density anomaly of water (lower density in the solid state than in the liquid state): The melting pressure curve shows a negative slope. The reason for the density anomaly is the hydrogen bonds.

Bild

Siemens Stiftung

My five senses

Graphic:
Drawing with labelling spaces for the five senses. Can be printed out or used with the projector.

What do our sense organs do?
- We use our eyes to see with,
- we use our nose to smell with,
- we use our ears to hear with,
- we use our tongue to taste with and
- we use our skin to touch with and feel.

Information and ideas:
The graphic can be printed out.
The students can then enter in the boxes what they can taste or hear.
Instead of words or text, small drawings, for example, can be drawn in (what I like to taste, smell or hear best of all) or small pictures cut out.

Relevant for teaching:
The human body
Structure and function of a sense organ
Reception of stimuli and processing of information
Senses discover the environment

Bildungsbereiche

Elementarbildung

Medientypen

Bild

Lernalter

6-10

Schlüsselwörter

Sense organ

Sprachen

Englisch

Bild

Siemens Stiftung

Microphone - transparent

Graphic:
With a moving coil microphone (dynamic microphone), the coil moves in "time" with the sound and produces a tone-frequency current.

In a microphone the mechanical energy of the sound waves is transduced into electric energy. From the mechanical vibrations the microphone produces an electric signal of the same frequency and amplitude.

Information and ideas:
Explanation of the process of sound transduction as it occurs in the inner ear of a human being using a technical device familiar to the students.

Relevant for teaching:
Sound/acoustics: parameters
Communication and understanding
Vibrations and waves

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Siemens Stiftung

Lorry

Photo:
The lorry is a typical road user that causes a lot of noise.

The big advantage of lorries is their flexibility. Compared to other means of transport like ships or trains though, they have several disadvantages: high energy consumption, exhaust fume emissions and noise. The lorry is a loud road user, reaching about 90 decibels on a noise level scale.

Information and ideas:
Use picture to start discussion or for illustration purposes.

Bild

Siemens Stiftung

Injuries to the ear through violence

Photo:
"Ouch!" Pulling at somebody's ears not only hurts, it can be dangerous and injure the ear both internally and externally!

Do not pull hard at somebody's ears or clip anyone round the ears because that can damage the sensitive ear.

Information and ideas:
A situation that can be observed in the school playground or at a children's playground. The photo can be used to start talking about the topic of how to protect the ears.

Possible questions:
What am I allowed to do to my ears?
What should I not do?
Why can a joke end up having serious consequences?

Relevant for teaching:
Hearing defects, hearing impairment
Personal health care

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Siemens Stiftung

Guitar, a classical string instrument

Photo:
Sound is produced by plucking strings and their vibrations are reflected by the resonance of the guitar body.

The vibration of the strings is transmitted to the body (soundboard) of the guitar which in turn vibrates and stimulates the air in the hollow body to vibrate itself. Finally a much bigger volume of air is now vibrating, the sound of the strings is much more clearly audible.

Information and ideas:
Guitar, violin and piano are good examples to illustrate the production of sound through vibrating objects on the one hand and, on the other hand, to show the importance and function of resonance bodies.

Relevant for teaching:
Acoustic phenomena
Sound/acoustics: parameters
Vibrations and waves

Bild

Siemens Stiftung

The Ear, Hearing and Hearing Impairment: Differentiated frequency ranges in the cochlea

Labeled graphic:
Position of the receptors for tones of varying frequencies in the spiral canal of the human cochlea.

Frequencies between 16 hertz (hertz = vibrations per second, abbr.: Hz) and 20,000 Hz can be heard by the human ear.
To differentiate these frequencies, the receptors for high tones are at the beginning of the canal, those for the low tones at the apex of the cochlea.

Information and ideas:
The illustration is suitable for explaining or revising fundamentals of Physics like sound, frequency and vibrations.
Usable in a worksheet, for work together on the digital projector, or as an overhead transparency.

Further information regarding this graphic is available on the media portal of the Siemens Stiftung.

Relevant for teaching:
The human body
Structure and function of a sense organ
Perception of sound
Human hearing ability
Communication and understanding

Bild

Siemens Stiftung

Color mixing with light-emitting diodes

Photos:
Colors can be generated according to the additive color mixing process even with two unregulated colored LEDs.


Colors can be generated according to the additive color mixing process even with two unregulated colored LEDs.

Information and ideas:
Precise instructions and teaching ideas for building a variable LED color mixer can also be found on the media portal of the Siemens Stiftung.

Medientypen

Bild

Lernalter

11-18

Schlüsselwörter

Color Theory Light Semiconductor

Sprachen

Englisch

Bild

Siemens Stiftung

; ; ;: Child with hearing aid

Graphic:
A boy and girl sitting at desks; the girl is wearing a hearing aid.

From the 2009 UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities we can derive that children with and without disabilities should be taught together.
The graphic can serve as an example of how technical aids can be used in the case of disabilities.

Information and ideas:
Use graphic as introduction to topic of hearing damage. A handicap is visible to everyone (see hearing aid, compare with armband worn by the blind.)

Relevant for teaching:
Hearing damage, hearing impairment
How hearing works
Sound transduction
Impairment of sensory organs

Bild

Siemens Stiftung

Mittelohr im Schnitt (mit Beschriftungspfeilen)

Grafik, unbeschriftet:Schnittansicht des menschlichen Ohrs mit den einzelnen Bestandteilen des Mittelohrs - mit Pfeilen für detaillierte Beschriftung.Das Mittelohr wird von einer luftgefüllten, mit Schleimhaut ausgekleideten Knochenhöhle gebildet und besteht hauptsächlich aus der Paukenhöhle und der Ohrtrompete (Eustachische Röhre). Die Paukenhöhle enthält die Gehörknöchelchen “Hammer”, “Amboss” und “Steigbügel”.Diese sind gelenkig gegeneinander beweglich, so dass mit ihrer Hilfe eine Übertragung der Trommelschwingung auf das Innenohr möglich ist. Hinweise und Ideen:Einsetzbar in einem Arbeitsblatt, zur gemeinsamen Erarbeitung über den Beamer, als Overhead-Folie.Unterrichtsbezug:Der menschliche KörperBau und Leistung eines Sinnesorgans

Medientypen

Bild

Lernalter

11-18

Schlüsselwörter

Anatomie (Mensch) Ohr

Sprachen

Deutsch