Bild

Siemens Stiftung

Entire ear with brain

Unlabeled graphic:
Cross-section of entire ear with auditory nerve and its connection to brain. For incorporation in presentations or for individual projection.

The hearing process does not just involve the hearing organ but also the brain. It is there that the signals are received and understood.

Information and ideas:
This graphic can be used to describe and explain the most important functional areas of the ear and their role in the hearing process.
The teacher can look at the graphic together with the students on the computer screen or get the students to do the labeling either on printouts or on the computer.

Relevant for teaching:
The human body
Structure and function of a sensory organ

Bild

Siemens Stiftung

Speech recognition sentence - syllable - phoneme

Chart:
The components of speech, from phoneme to sentence presented visually.

The graphic shows the oscilloscope curve of the spoken sentence "It?s raining cats and dogs" and excerpts from the units from which speech is composed: sentence, word, phoneme.

Information and ideas:
Speech recognition and speech synthesis are very topical themes in the field of information and communication technology.
Further information on this graphic is available as information sheet on the media portal of the Siemens Stiftung.

Relevant for teaching:
The human body
Structure and function of a sense organ
Reception of impulses and information transmission
Sensory perception

Anderer Ressourcentyp

Siemens Stiftung

The Ear, Hearing and Hearing Impairment: The entire hearing process (M/HS)

Teaching ideas:
For teaching unit "The entire hearing process". Overview of passage of sound in the ear: outer ear, middle ear, inner ear.

During the hearing process the energy form of the sound waves is transduced into electrical impulses. This happens in several stages.

Information and ideas:
Logical structure for looking at the subject. Suitable for active and passive forms of learning.

Relevant for teaching:
The human body
Structure and functions of a sensory organ
Reception of stimuli and transmission of information
Functions of senses


Dieses Material ist Teil einer Sammlung

Anderer Ressourcentyp

Siemens Stiftung

Nerve conduction in the skin

Simulation:
Process of transmitting nerve impulses in the skin.

If a stimulus is exerted on the skin (e.g., through touch or heat), the affected receptor immediately transfers an electrical impulse to the next nerve cell. In this way, the impulse travels across several nerve cells and finally reaches the spinal cord and then the brain, which ultimately processes the information.

Three animations show the process of transmitting impulses in different degrees of detail.

Anderer Ressourcentyp

Siemens Stiftung

Nerve conduction in the skin

Information sheet:
A stimulus is received by a receptor and transmitted across the nerve cells to the brain.

The cells of the nervous system are introduced and the basic structure of a nerve cell is described. The process of transmitting a nerve impulse from the skin to the brain is explained based on saltatory conduction.
In addition, the different skin sensors are introduced:
· Free nerve endings
· Tactile corpuscles (Meissner?s corpuscles)
· Cold receptors (Krause?s corpuscles)
· Heat receptors (Ruffini?s corpuscles)
· Pressure receptors (Pacinian corpuscles)

Anderer Ressourcentyp

Siemens Stiftung

The structure of the ear

Interactive graphic:
The areas of the ear can be labeled interactively.


The graphic shows the four areas involved in the hearing process: outer ear, middle ear, inner ear, and brain. The graphic can be labeled individually by area or as a whole.
The labeling is very detailed and differentiated.

Relevant for teaching:
The human body
Structure and performance of a sensory organ


Dieses Material ist Teil einer Sammlung

Anderer Ressourcentyp

Siemens Stiftung

Skin receptors

Interactive schematic diagram:
The layers of the skin and the receptors they contain can be labeled interactively.

The graphic shows the three areas of the skin (epidermis, dermis, subcutis) and the receptors they contain for pain, sense of touch, cold, heat, and pressure. The receptors receive the external stimuli and forward them to the nervous system.

The graphic can be labeled individually or as a whole.

Bild

Siemens Stiftung

Frequency differentiation in the uncurled cochlea

Labeled graphic:
High-pitched tones are heard in the front part of the cochlea, low tones are heard in the back part.

As the sense of hearing is able to differentiate locations of the nerves, it is able to recognize the frequencies.

Information and ideas:
This graphic is good for creating a link between the topics of "Sound? and "Hearing?.
Further information regarding this graphic is available as information sheet on the media portal of the Siemens Stiftung.

Relevant for teaching:
Perception of sound
Human hearing ability
Communication and understanding
The human body
Structure and functions of a sensory organ

Anderer Ressourcentyp

Siemens Stiftung

Guideline for the "The structure of the ear" interactive whiteboard content

Guideline:
This document provides an overview of a possible scenario for using the content package for interactive whiteboards entitled "The structure of the ear".


This guideline is intended for teachers. It presents all media of the content package and puts them in a meaningful didactic context using examples.


Dieses Material ist Teil einer Sammlung

Anderer Ressourcentyp

Siemens Stiftung

Hear, recognize and understand speech (interactive)

Animation:
Shows how ear and sense of hearing interact. The ear alone is not enough - a little brain is also necessary!

Hearing is not just the reception of the sound but it also involves the processing of the impulses in the brain.
A spoken sentence reaches our ear in the shape of sound waves, it is collected and beamed through the pinna, amplified via the eardrum and the ossicles and it then stimulates the sensory cells in the cochlea. These cells send the impulses along the auditory nerve which conveys the impulses into the auditory centre of the brain.
In the brain, the signals are recognized as words and their meaning understood as a sentence in context with other words.

Information and ideas:
This process should be explained step by step.
It may be useful to make a comparison with a dynamo:
The pedalling on a bicycle moves the dynamo on the wheel, something happens. The impulse is passed on, a lamp lights up; what happens in the hearing process is similar as an impulse is also sent to the brain, and there, too, "a light" goes on.

Relevant for teaching:
Structure and function of a sensory organ
Reception of stimuli and transmission of information
Communication


Dieses Material ist Teil einer Sammlung