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Siemens Stiftung

The Ear, Hearing and Hearing Impairment: With eyes blindfolded

Photo:
To illustrate the topic "Seeing with your ears?.

When the sense of sight is not working, another sense can replace the eyes. We pick up a lot of information about our environment from our ears and can thus, in part, at least, substitute the sense of sight.

Information and ideas:
For example, students can try out themselves on a listening walk whether they can guess where they are.

Relevant for teaching:
The human body
Structure and function of a sensory organ
Senses discover the environment

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Siemens Stiftung

The Ear, Hearing and Hearing Impairment;: Shark - hearing with the entire body

Graphic:
Slice image of the hearing organ (lateral-line organ) of a shark.

The shark as example of an animal that hears mainly with a part of its body surface.
Caption:
(a) pores
(b) inner canals filled with gelatinous fluid
(c) sensory cells containing the so called cilia
(d) nerves


Information and ideas:
The graphic is suitable for comparing the sensory cells in the human ear. Everyday context: methods of electroacoustic recording of sound with normal microphone and surface microphone.
Further information on the measuring method "audiometry" is available as information sheet on the media portal of the Siemens Stiftung.

Relevant for teaching:
Structure and function of a sensory organ
Reception of stimuli and processing of information
Senses discover the environment
Sound/acoustics: hearing range, hearing frequency limit

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Siemens Stiftung

Lorry

Photo:
The lorry is a typical road user that causes a lot of noise.

The big advantage of lorries is their flexibility. Compared to other means of transport like ships or trains though, they have several disadvantages: high energy consumption, exhaust fume emissions and noise. The lorry is a loud road user, reaching about 90 decibels on a noise level scale.

Information and ideas:
Use picture to start discussion or for illustration purposes.

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Siemens Stiftung

The Ear, Hearing and Hearing Impairment: Differentiated frequency ranges in the cochlea

Labeled graphic:
Position of the receptors for tones of varying frequencies in the spiral canal of the human cochlea.

Frequencies between 16 hertz (hertz = vibrations per second, abbr.: Hz) and 20,000 Hz can be heard by the human ear.
To differentiate these frequencies, the receptors for high tones are at the beginning of the canal, those for the low tones at the apex of the cochlea.

Information and ideas:
The illustration is suitable for explaining or revising fundamentals of Physics like sound, frequency and vibrations.
Usable in a worksheet, for work together on the digital projector, or as an overhead transparency.

Further information regarding this graphic is available on the media portal of the Siemens Stiftung.

Relevant for teaching:
The human body
Structure and function of a sense organ
Perception of sound
Human hearing ability
Communication and understanding

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Siemens Stiftung

The Ear, Hearing and Hearing Impairment: Police car

Photo:
Police car as typical road user.

Information and ideas:
Use picture to start discussion or for illustration purposes.

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Siemens Stiftung

Motorbike

Photo:
Motorcyclist as typical road user.

Above all, when motorbikes drive fast, they become loud road users, with levels of up to 80 decibels being recorded.

Information and ideas:
Use picture to start discussion or for illustration purposes.

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Siemens Stiftung

Frequency differentiation in the uncurled cochlea

Labeled graphic:
High-pitched tones are heard in the front part of the cochlea, low tones are heard in the back part.

As the sense of hearing is able to differentiate locations of the nerves, it is able to recognize the frequencies.

Information and ideas:
This graphic is good for creating a link between the topics of "Sound? and "Hearing?.
Further information regarding this graphic is available as information sheet on the media portal of the Siemens Stiftung.

Relevant for teaching:
Perception of sound
Human hearing ability
Communication and understanding
The human body
Structure and functions of a sensory organ

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Siemens Stiftung

Car

Photo:
Car as typical source of sound and noise in traffic.

A car in normal town traffic produces about 80 decibels.

Information and ideas:
Use picture to introduce topic or for illustration purposes.

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Siemens Stiftung

Sounds around the house

Graphic:
Which sounds are audible in a house?

Typical sounds occur around the house.

Information and ideas:
Good for illustration purposes in combination with the corresponding recordings.
Possible questions:
- Who can say what the sounds are and explain
them, perhaps even imitate them?
- What sounds are missing?
- Do the sounds differ according to
time of day, time of year and location?
-Who does not like the sound? Who likes it?

Other ideas:
- Students can make noises or sounds of their own
or record them
- Teacher plays recording and students have to
guess which room they are in

Relevant for teaching:
Senses discover the environment
Games to practise using the senses

Bildungsbereiche

Elementarbildung

Medientypen

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Lernalter

6-10

Schlüsselwörter

Sense of hearing

Sprachen

Englisch

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Siemens Stiftung

Abnormal audiometric audibility limit

Chart:
Audiometric audibility limit of a person with hearing impairment compared to an intact sense of hearing shows handicap in speech range.

The speech range is that range of frequency and loudness where speech communication usually takes place. Within the audiometric audibility limit it is the kidney-shaped range. In our chart it is coloured blue. When, for example, hair cells are damaged in the inner ear and no longer work, the audiometric audibility limit changes. The speech range is affected.

Information and ideas:
An attempt at comparing charts showing normal hearing and reduced hearing can be done by students individually - as homework. It is useful for testing written expression (English) as well as for testing basic skills from Mathematics or Physics (how to interpret a chart, for example).

Relevant for teaching:
Hearing defects/hearing impairment
How hearing functions
Sound/acoustics