Bild

Siemens Stiftung

Frequenzdifferenzierung in der ausgerollten Schnecke

Grafik, beschriftet: Hohe Töne werden im vorderen Teil der Schnecke, tiefe Töne dagegen im hinteren Teil wahrgenommen.Da der Hörsinn den Ort der Ableitung der Nerven von den Hörzellen differenziert, erkennt er die Frequenzen. Hinweise und Ideen:Diese Grafik eignet sich gut für eine Überleitung - es werden die Themen “Schall” und “Hören” miteinander verknüpft.Weitere inhaltliche Informationen zu dieser Grafik gibt es als Sachinformation auf dem Medienportal der Siemens Stiftung.Unterrichtsbezug:SchallwahrnehmungDas menschliche Hörvermögen Kommunikation und VerständigungDer menschliche KörperBau und Leistung eines Sinnesorgans

Bild

Siemens Stiftung

Injuries to the ear through violence

Photo:
"Ouch!" Pulling at somebody's ears not only hurts, it can be dangerous and injure the ear both internally and externally!

Do not pull hard at somebody's ears or clip anyone round the ears because that can damage the sensitive ear.

Information and ideas:
A situation that can be observed in the school playground or at a children's playground. The photo can be used to start talking about the topic of how to protect the ears.

Possible questions:
What am I allowed to do to my ears?
What should I not do?
Why can a joke end up having serious consequences?

Relevant for teaching:
Hearing defects, hearing impairment
Personal health care

Bild

Siemens Stiftung

Außenohr im Schnitt - Beschriftungspfeile

Grafik, unbeschriftet: Die Grafik zeigt in einer Schnittansicht des Gesamtohrs, welche Teile des Ohrs zum äußeren Ohr gehören. Diese Teile sind farblich hervorgehoben.Zum äußeren Ohr gehören die Ohrmuschel und der Gehörgang. Der Gehörgang endet am Trommelfell. In der häutigen Wand des Gehörgangs befinden sich Drüsen, die das Cerumen, das Ohrenschmalz, bilden. Am Rand des Gehörgangs befinden sich kleine Härchen, die Haarbälge, welche dem Schutz vor Fremdkörpern dienen.Hinweise und Ideen:Hilfreich, um Außen-, Innen-, Mittelohr voneinander abzugrenzen. Einsetzbar in einem Arbeitsblatt, zur gemeinsamen Erarbeitung über den Beamer, als Overhead-Folie.Unterrichtsbezug:Der menschliche KörperBau und Leistung eines Sinnesorgans

Bild

Siemens Stiftung

The Ear, Hearing and Hearing Impairment: With eyes blindfolded

Photo:
To illustrate the topic "Seeing with your ears?.

When the sense of sight is not working, another sense can replace the eyes. We pick up a lot of information about our environment from our ears and can thus, in part, at least, substitute the sense of sight.

Information and ideas:
For example, students can try out themselves on a listening walk whether they can guess where they are.

Relevant for teaching:
The human body
Structure and function of a sensory organ
Senses discover the environment

Bild

Siemens Stiftung

Speech recognition sentence - syllable - phoneme

Chart:
The components of speech, from phoneme to sentence presented visually.

The graphic shows the oscilloscope curve of the spoken sentence "It?s raining cats and dogs" and excerpts from the units from which speech is composed: sentence, word, phoneme.

Information and ideas:
Speech recognition and speech synthesis are very topical themes in the field of information and communication technology.
Further information on this graphic is available as information sheet on the media portal of the Siemens Stiftung.

Relevant for teaching:
The human body
Structure and function of a sense organ
Reception of impulses and information transmission
Sensory perception

Bild

Siemens Stiftung

Speech signal - individual word

Chart:
Screenshot of the oscillographic curve of the spoken word "dogs".

Speech sounds are fluctuating sound signals where the composition of frequencies changes all the time.
Aperiodical overlap periodical parts. Unlike noises, some of which have similar frequency curves, sound in speech is always the carrier of meaning or of messages sent out by the speaker. Other noises like smacking of lips, hissing, rhythms, basic pitch are typical of the individual (acoustic fingerprint) but not essential for the speech content!

Information and ideas:
Supplementary to worksheets and transparencies.

Relevant for teaching:
Sound/acoustics: parameters
Vibrations and waves
Communication and understanding

Bild

Siemens Stiftung

The Ear, Hearing and Hearing Impairment: Sense organs - sense of feeling

Graphic:
How sensitively our skin reacts to temperatures can be seen in the sauna. After the heat, the cold gets our blood circulation going!

The skin gives us information about temperatures via receptors. As a rule, the heat in the sauna makes our blood pressure go down. The subsequent sensation of cold on the skin does not just stimulate the peripheral blood circulation. A reflex reaction via the autonomic nervous system causes our blood pressure to rise to the normal level again as well.

Information and ideas:
Use picture to introduce topic with the question "What can we feel with our skin?", e.g. cold, heat, wind etc.

Relevant for teaching:
The human body
Structure and function of a sensory organ
Reception of stimuli and processing of information
Senses discover the environment

Bild

Siemens Stiftung

The Ear, Hearing and Hearing Impairment; Teaching unit: How I hear; ; Teaching unit: Personal health care for the ear: Sense organ ear

Photo:
A close-up photo of an ear. As starting-point for studying the anatomy of the ear.

The ear as a sense organ contains the sense of hearing as well as the sense of position and the sense of rotation.

The sense of hearing is the only sense we have that never goes to sleep. The ear reacts seven times faster than the eye and can differentiate things much better than the nose.

Contribution to hearing:
The pinna is thought to have a funnelling function for sound waves. Unlike in some animals, this function is not particularly well-developed in human beings. If the pinna is in any way deformed or in the case of ears that stick out, the sense of hearing is not noticeably affected either way.
Completely missing pinna may affect hearing to the factor 2-3 depending on position relative to sound of source!

Information and ideas:
What are all the things I can hear? Here, it is a good idea to take the students on a listening walk or look at the effects of a roundabout.

Relevant for teaching:
The human body
Structure and function of a sense organ
Reception of stimuli and processing of information
Senses discover the environment

Bild

Siemens Stiftung

Perforation of the eardrum

Labeled graphic:
Simplified illustration of a perforated eardrum.

A perforated eardrum can occur when foreign bodies, for example, instruments to clean the ears, are stuck in too far or when there are loud bangs near the ear.
Violent blows to the ear can also cause perforation.

Minor tears or perforations can heal up by themselves provided they get the proper treatment. In any case, a doctor should always be consulted!

Information and ideas:
Can be used for illustration purposes on the subject of "Ear diseases" either on transparencies or worksheets. Supposedly "harmless" minor problems can turn into serious damage to the ear.

Relevant for teaching:
Hearing defect/hearing impairment

Bild

Siemens Stiftung

The Ear, Hearing and Hearing Impairment: Differentiated frequency ranges in the cochlea

Labeled graphic:
Position of the receptors for tones of varying frequencies in the spiral canal of the human cochlea.

Frequencies between 16 hertz (hertz = vibrations per second, abbr.: Hz) and 20,000 Hz can be heard by the human ear.
To differentiate these frequencies, the receptors for high tones are at the beginning of the canal, those for the low tones at the apex of the cochlea.

Information and ideas:
The illustration is suitable for explaining or revising fundamentals of Physics like sound, frequency and vibrations.
Usable in a worksheet, for work together on the digital projector, or as an overhead transparency.

Further information regarding this graphic is available on the media portal of the Siemens Stiftung.

Relevant for teaching:
The human body
Structure and function of a sense organ
Perception of sound
Human hearing ability
Communication and understanding