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Siemens Stiftung

How does a shark hear?

Graphic:
Shark and its hearing organ (lateral-line organ).

The shark as an example of an animal that mainly hears with its body surface. The sense of hearing (lateral-line organ) is sketched in.
Information and ideas:
Picture to introduce topic "How do animals communicate with each other?".
Further information regarding this graphic is available as information sheet on the media portal of the Siemens Stiftung

Relevant for teaching:
Sound/acoustics: hearing range, hearing frequency limit
Communication, Understanding

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Siemens Stiftung

Frequency differentiation in the uncurled cochlea

Labeled graphic:
High-pitched tones are heard in the front part of the cochlea, low tones are heard in the back part.

As the sense of hearing is able to differentiate locations of the nerves, it is able to recognize the frequencies.

Information and ideas:
This graphic is good for creating a link between the topics of "Sound? and "Hearing?.
Further information regarding this graphic is available as information sheet on the media portal of the Siemens Stiftung.

Relevant for teaching:
Perception of sound
Human hearing ability
Communication and understanding
The human body
Structure and functions of a sensory organ

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Siemens Stiftung

Speech recognition sentence - syllable - phoneme

Chart:
The components of speech, from phoneme to sentence presented visually.

The graphic shows the oscilloscope curve of the spoken sentence "It?s raining cats and dogs" and excerpts from the units from which speech is composed: sentence, word, phoneme.

Information and ideas:
Speech recognition and speech synthesis are very topical themes in the field of information and communication technology.
Further information on this graphic is available as information sheet on the media portal of the Siemens Stiftung.

Relevant for teaching:
The human body
Structure and function of a sense organ
Reception of impulses and information transmission
Sensory perception

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Siemens Stiftung

The Ear, Hearing and Hearing Impairment: Differentiated frequency ranges in the cochlea

Labeled graphic:
Position of the receptors for tones of varying frequencies in the spiral canal of the human cochlea.

Frequencies between 16 hertz (hertz = vibrations per second, abbr.: Hz) and 20,000 Hz can be heard by the human ear.
To differentiate these frequencies, the receptors for high tones are at the beginning of the canal, those for the low tones at the apex of the cochlea.

Information and ideas:
The illustration is suitable for explaining or revising fundamentals of Physics like sound, frequency and vibrations.
Usable in a worksheet, for work together on the digital projector, or as an overhead transparency.

Further information regarding this graphic is available on the media portal of the Siemens Stiftung.

Relevant for teaching:
The human body
Structure and function of a sense organ
Perception of sound
Human hearing ability
Communication and understanding