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Siemens Stiftung

The Ear, Hearing and Hearing Impairment: Differentiated frequency ranges in the cochlea

Labeled graphic:
Position of the receptors for tones of varying frequencies in the spiral canal of the human cochlea.

Frequencies between 16 hertz (hertz = vibrations per second, abbr.: Hz) and 20,000 Hz can be heard by the human ear.
To differentiate these frequencies, the receptors for high tones are at the beginning of the canal, those for the low tones at the apex of the cochlea.

Information and ideas:
The illustration is suitable for explaining or revising fundamentals of Physics like sound, frequency and vibrations.
Usable in a worksheet, for work together on the digital projector, or as an overhead transparency.

Further information regarding this graphic is available on the media portal of the Siemens Stiftung.

Relevant for teaching:
The human body
Structure and function of a sense organ
Perception of sound
Human hearing ability
Communication and understanding

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Siemens Stiftung

The Ear, Hearing and Hearing Impairment: Police car

Photo:
Police car as typical road user.

Information and ideas:
Use picture to start discussion or for illustration purposes.

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Siemens Stiftung

Motorbike

Photo:
Motorcyclist as typical road user.

Above all, when motorbikes drive fast, they become loud road users, with levels of up to 80 decibels being recorded.

Information and ideas:
Use picture to start discussion or for illustration purposes.

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Siemens Stiftung

Frequency differentiation in the uncurled cochlea

Labeled graphic:
High-pitched tones are heard in the front part of the cochlea, low tones are heard in the back part.

As the sense of hearing is able to differentiate locations of the nerves, it is able to recognize the frequencies.

Information and ideas:
This graphic is good for creating a link between the topics of "Sound? and "Hearing?.
Further information regarding this graphic is available as information sheet on the media portal of the Siemens Stiftung.

Relevant for teaching:
Perception of sound
Human hearing ability
Communication and understanding
The human body
Structure and functions of a sensory organ

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Siemens Stiftung

Car

Photo:
Car as typical source of sound and noise in traffic.

A car in normal town traffic produces about 80 decibels.

Information and ideas:
Use picture to introduce topic or for illustration purposes.

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Siemens Stiftung

Training of senses

Photo:
A girl is shaking a film container in order to identify the content of the container by means of the noise.

This photo shows a situation from a listening memory game. The game involves the ability to remember and recognize things.

Information and ideas:
This is how the game is played:
Different materials like sand, rice, dried peas, pebbles or stones, flour etc. are filled into empty film containers, two containers for each material. Now the players have to match the pairs by identifying the material inside the containers by shaking The whole game can be played with teams of two partners as well. Each player gets a film container and has to go round and compare the sounds made when the containers are shaken and thus find his or her partner.
(Tip: Label all the containers on the bottom,
for example with colored dots so that the pairs can be clearly recognized again.)

Relevant for teaching:
The human body
Structure and functions of a sense organ
Senses discover the environment

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Siemens Stiftung

The Ear, Hearing and Hearing Impairment: Hearing

Photo:
A girl holds her open hand up to her ear to signalise that she is listening. Introduction to the topic "hearing" but also to "listening".

We use our ears to hear with. The only visible part of the hearing organ is the pinna. It collects the sound and conducts it into the ear canal. If somebody wants to understand better, they automatically hold their hand up to the ear to increase the size of the funnel. That has no immediate effect but has, in the meantime, become a sort of automatic gesture.

Information and ideas:
Introductory picture to the subject "Hearing" and into the discussion of the hearing process. What happens after the sound is picked up by the pinna?

Relevant for teaching:
The human body
Structure and function of a sensory organ
Reception of stimuli and transmission of information

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Siemens Stiftung

; ;: Entire ear section - unlabeled

Unlabeled graphic:
Cross-section of the entire ear, for example, to be incorporated in presentations or for individual projection.

Cross-section of entire ear.

Information and ideas:
This graphic can be used to describe and explain the most important functional areas of the ear and their role in the hearing process.
The teacher can look at the graphic together with the students on the computer screen or get the students to do the labelling either on printouts or on the computer.

Relevant for teaching:
The human body
Structure and function of a sensory organ

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Siemens Stiftung

Normal audiometric audibility limit

Chart:
Audiometric audibility limit of a person with normal hearing with typical frequency and loudness ranges for speech and music.

The speech range is that range of frequency and loudness where speech communication usually takes place. Within the audiometric audibility limit it is the kidney-shaped range. In our diagram it is coloured blue.

Information and ideas:
An attempt at comparing diagrams showing normal hearing and reduced hearing can be done by students individually - as homework. It is useful for testing written expression (English) as well as for testing basic skills from Mathematics or Physics (how to interpret a diagram, for example).

Relevant for teaching:
Hearing defects/hearing impairment
How hearing functions
Sound/acoustics

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Siemens Stiftung

How does a shark hear?

Graphic:
Shark and its hearing organ (lateral-line organ).

The shark as an example of an animal that mainly hears with its body surface. The sense of hearing (lateral-line organ) is sketched in.
Information and ideas:
Picture to introduce topic "How do animals communicate with each other?".
Further information regarding this graphic is available as information sheet on the media portal of the Siemens Stiftung

Relevant for teaching:
Sound/acoustics: hearing range, hearing frequency limit
Communication, Understanding